sins invalid

For the last two years, performers and activists have been organizing a show on disability, invisibility, and sexuality in San Francisco, titled Sins Invalid [link isn’t work safe]. This past November, I watched the clips on youtube and pretended I was there. Must figure out a way to get there next year. : )

Here is an interview with one performer, Soledad Decosta who describes herself as “an uppity Portuguese woman who isn’t afraid to claim her black latina maternal ancestry”. In her interview, she describes her experience as a disabled intersex person.

“It’s not just like just let’s get it on. It’s like “…no, let’s have a discussion.”
It’s not everybody that always wants to have a discussion—people want to have sex, you know— and it’s not that simple when you’re in a position like mine and that’s true for a lot of pwds if not all all pwds, especially if you’re dealing with something that’s, you know, rendered as somehow visibly otherizing in the context of negotiating sex, having sex, and being a sexual human being. It’s not like there’s some guidebook. It’s not like you go to Barnes and Noble and there’s like a hundred books on hot crip sex with intersex person. There’s just not. It’s like I’m the book— hello, I’m the book— ask me, open me up.” —Soledad (this segment starts at 2:08 part of the clip)

What stood out to me were the two lines below, largely because although Soledad is a queer disabled person, both situations could easily apply to a disabled OR queer person, particularly those with bodies that aren’t considered the norm. The two communities have a lot of commonalities. (distrust for doctors or the medical industrial complex, body issues, defying labels, the list goes on and on…):

“For example, if I get into an accident, what’s going to happen to me? There are people whose bodies are similar to mine, you get in an accident and they don’t know how to categorize you. They may deny you treatment while you’re dying there on the sidewalk.”

“They—that is those doctors— they didn’t get things quite right. Instead of praising my birth, they cut. …They held me down and did things to me that no one should have to go through without their consent.”

You can find more Sins Invalid interviews by clicking here. And it’s HOT!! (oh and again not work safe). : D

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6 Comments

Filed under disability, links, queer issues/culture, sexuality

6 responses to “sins invalid

  1. a former colleague of mine helps organize this show – I was out of town the weekend it was performed this year but I am definitely planning on going next year! I heard it was amazing!

  2. um. Holy crap, I just watched that clip – the voiceover voice is the colleague I was talking about. Such a small world!

    and LeRoy!

  3. Wow, that sounds awesome. Is Emi Koyama involved with it?

    I’m not sure if something like that could ever happen in the UK. It would be awesome, but i just don’t know who would be into it – all the queer/sex radical activism that i know of seems to be either in Canada or (certain parts of) the US…

  4. It reminds me of this story where two women planning to take their child on a cruise had the unthinkable happen in the Anti-Gay State of Florida!
    Read it here how they denied her access as her partner lay dying!

  5. I had a brain fart, so bear with me, it just brought to mind that thing about an accident. I have had experiences with hospitals asking me who was going to “take care of my husband” after his strokes. He was disabled before, which they couldn’t believe, and said “Where was he living before?” I said, with me!

    I had to explain that there are such things as Independent Living, Attendant Services and that gay people can be disabled and can love!

  6. Great interview, thanks for sharing it!

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